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How to replace damaged eave fascia boards

  • Written by  Danny Lipford
How to replace damaged eave fascia boards

The eaves on a house are enclosed with a vertical fascia board to cover the end of the roof rafters or ceiling joists, and horizontal soffit boards to cover the bottom of the roofs rafters or joists.

Due to their exposure to the elements, fascia boards can rot over time. They are also a favorite target for squirrels. Here’s how to replace them:

Remove Damaged Fascia Board: Use a flat pry bar to remove the damaged fascia board. If the board is covered by guttering, you will need to carefully remove the gutter first.

Match Fascia Board: Buy a new board that matches the old fascia board in both thickness and width. In addition to wood, you can also replace damaged fascia boards with Cellular PVC or fiber cement material.

Cut New Fascia Board: Using the damaged fascia board as a pattern, cut the new fascia board to match. Join two fascia boards together over a rafter or joist at a 45° angle by setting your circular saw to 45 degrees, then cutting square across the width of the board.

Attach New Fascia Board: Trial fit the new fascia board in place, and attach it with 8-penny galvanized or stainless steel finishing nails.

Caulk and Paint New Fascia Board: Caulk any joints or seams in the new fascia board and fill nail holes. After the caulking has set, prime and paint the new board.

 Watch the video for details.

For more information, visit TodaysHomeowner.com.

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