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The Erwin House Part 3

The Erwin house has never been opened to the public. The Pender family invited me in to make pictures that I may share with you. Descendants of J.M.F. Erwin and Georgia Bryan Erwin have occupied the house since 1861.

It is filled with wonderful treasures they have accumulated over 160 years. The house is delightfully decorated. If you appreciate getting to see the interior of the house, please let the Pender family know.

We start with a portrait of Colonel Erwin in his Confederate uniform. It hangs over the mantel in the parlor.
Kim Bryan Pender, presently resides here was painted by her mother-in-law, Jane Ludlum Pender in 1989. It hangs over the mantel in the dining room.

The Rosewood Steinway Grand Piano number 875 was a wedding gift from
Mr. Erwin to his bride in 1859. They married in 1861. It sits in the northwest corner of the parlor.

Northeast corner of the parlor. Looking through the doorway into the hall you can see the stairway.

The 78 RPM phonograph still works. It probably dates to the 1920s. These are located in the southeast corner of the parlor.

The dining room looking south. The parlor is seen through the door.

The dining room looking north.

erwin-house-17The entry, which is typical of all the antebellum houses in Greenwood. They have double doors, a transom and side lights to let light into the room, as there is no place to put windows. Great Oaks is an exception to this, in that the entrance hall extends forward off the front wall 8 feet, thus permitting side windows to be installed. Remember, it was the last built.
In this picture you see one of the real treasures the family saved. That is the crossbar on the door for additional security.

The upper hall showing the 1850s staircase. Note especially the shiplap board on the right side indicating this was once an open area.

In the picture below, the trunk was carried to West Point in 1890 by Isaac Erwin when he was a cadet. He was the son of J.M.F. and Georgia Bryan. The trunk still contains his military records and he fought in the Spanish-American war and retired from the Army as a Colonel. Colonel Irwin is buried in the Greenwood Baptist Cemetery

Upstairs, the east bedroom. An interesting collection of antiques which probably date from about the 1860s and 1870s. The doll bed at the foot of the antique bed belonged to Georgia when she was a little girl living at Great Oaks.

The West Bedroom. The bed is referred to as a Jenny Lind style. Note the two marble top washstands of similar design except for their width. Wardrobes were used because the early homes had no closets.

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Last modified onThursday, 02 January 2014 18:51
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